Startup Junkies

America's Startup Booster Rocket Since 2004

Tony Robbins

Here’s a transcript of Tony Robbins Motivating The Hell Out Of His Reluctant Sales Team

There are 5-10 audio cassettes in this office that are treated like gold.

Tony Robbins is the star of three of them.

The rare 1992 recording of Tony Robbins that I’m sharing with you today probably hasn’t been heard by more than 100 people. And that’s being very generous.

Now I’m not giving you the audio for this recording here and you should be grateful to me for this because the quality of the recording itself is shit.

This is a recorded conference call with the tiny group of people who owned his franchises back in 1992. Need I say more?

There are conference call recordings today that are garbled garbage. This was 22 years ago in the recorded conference call dinosaur age. You don’t want to imagine how bad it is.

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Forget Business Plans. Business Maps are the Answer

The pace of change has accelerated to the point where a business plan is no longer enough to plot the future of your business with any certainty. Disruptive technologies or unexpected competitors can come along and displace your business overnight. How do you position your business in this hyper-competitive environment?

Different from a business plan, which will likely be obsolete in five years, a business map helps you close the gap between where you are and where you want to be. This is force #1 of the 7 Forces of Business Mastery: Know Where You Really Are and Create an Effective Business Map.

To create an effective business map, first ask yourself “What business am I in?

And then drill a little deeper. For instance, what business is Starbucks in? Most people would say the coffee business. But ask Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz, and he will likely tell you about his trip to Italy, where he saw people eagerly meeting in cafes before and after work. He saw the promise of a transitional meeting place between home and work, and that was the seed that grew into Starbucks. He knew his business was about creating an experience, not just delivering coffee.

The next two questions are: “What business am I really in?” and “How is business?

How is this useful? Back in the early 1900s, if railroad companies in the U.S. realized that they were really in the transportation business, not the railroad business, they could have prevented the entire industry from going bankrupt as the trucking industry took over.
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